Project LIT Chapter

Spartanburg High School has been selected as a chapter in the nationwide Project LIT community. As the logo says, “It’s not just reading, it’s a movement”. There are more than 1,000 Project Lit chapters across more than forty-five states (along with a few international chapters). The Project LIT Community is a national, grass roots literacy movement, a team of educators and students who work together to

• Empower our students as readers, writers, and leaders
• Promote a love of reading in schools and communities
• Read, discuss, and celebrate books that make our students feel seen, heard,
affirmed, and valued
• Champion young people and books that reflect their lived realities, communities,
and identities

The Spartanburg High School librarians’ Project LIT program includes: two ninth grade teachers reading Long Way Down by Jason Reynolds, four book buckets filled with thirty different Project LIT title selections, an online bookclub reading titles together as well as independently while exploring cultural and thematic topics, and hosting community leaders and authors to extend the literacy discussion beyond the book and outside the classroom.

The library staff thanks Terry Pruitt and Vance Jones for funding this important initiative. Without their support, we would not have been able to participate in this amazing program.

7Reads – Kristina McMorris

Kristina McMorris, a New York Times best selling author, visited Spartanburg High School as part of the 7Reads Program. She shared with students how she became an author. We really appreciate the information she shared about the importance of reading and her research methodology. Her historical fiction books include information about World War II, the Great Depression, and Alcatraz. Thank you Kristina for visiting our school!

7Reads – Lance Rubin

Author Lance Rubin came on September 26th and talked to classes. Students had the opportunity to try improv and then later writing a very short story. Lance Rubin gave them the first sentence to write and then students wrote the rest of the story on their own. Lance was a dynamic speaker, and the students thoroughly enjoyed his presentation.